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This is an excellent and inspiring book for anyone interested in creating logo designs that are visually appealing, iconic, and basically the best that a logo could be.

The first part of the book goes through the importance of a logo and the elements that create an iconic design. Using examples on every page, the book is a great reference. It gives some useful advice to remember when designing a logo, for example, remember to keep it simple. Keeping a logo simple helps a design be more versatile, but most importantly, it is easier to remember.

Part 2 of the book focuses on the process of design: gathering information, things to consider, handling the client, assembling the client brief as well as raising the question of when is a good time for re-branding? Pricing design is also an insightful chapter – this is a topic I find on many design blogs, but Airey couldn’t put it better.

The insight to Airey’s design process in ‘From Pencil to PDF’ is fantastic. I have since started implementing his process and it has really helped me gather all my thoughts into one channel of focus. I’d recommend trying his method to everyone. This method includes mind mapping for ideas, and then sketching from the strong points in the mind map to putting together a logo on the computer. But it doesn’t end there! Airey also points out the importance of a client seeing the proposed logo in real world context and suggests using Photoshop to demonstrate. By putting a logo on a truck, or a shopping bag, or even just a mock up website, the client sees that the logo can in fact work! You can download your free copy of this chapter here : Logo Design Love Free Chapter

Many designers say they wish there was a class in college that focuses soley on how to handle difficult clients. Nobody is really prepared for the real world. Airey gives solid professional reasoning to use with the client that thinks they (or their dog) can design. Chapter 8, “the art of the conversation” guides you along the right course to follow, who to deal with, so that hopefully you won’t find yourself in a sticky situation.

The last part of the book is about keeping inspired and motivated, a few points to remember when you might find yourself a little stuck in a rut. All creative people do go through this and some of these tips will for sure get you back into your groove.

Airey also takes some of his most popular questions from his blog David Airey and answers them. Some of these include questions on online portfolio creation, what to do with pricing when it comes to friends and family, similar looking logos, rights of use, who owns what, how many concepts should be presented and many more.

All the tips given in this book will be helpful to anyone, experienced or just starting out.

I loved the whole book and was sad when I had finished reading it, it was just so insightful I wanted more! Luckily for me, Airey also runs a blog called Logo Design Love, which is full of tips, resources and the latest news on the world’s top/upcoming logos.

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6 Comments so far

  1. […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Jacques van Heerden, grablermassive, LogoDesignNews, dava_999, Don Rogers and others. Don Rogers said: Logo Design Love : Book Review | Creativeoverflow http://ht.ly/2o8x2 […]

  2. David Airey says:

    Thanks for the kind words, Natasha. Thanks very much.

  3. Gadget Guy says:

    Looks like a great book. I’m sure Airey put a lot of work into it, I wais I could get a copy

  4. Max says:

    Thank you for a great review and by the way I was looking for some books and software to create a nice looking logo for my friends website. I haven’t got any Ideas about how to do this but now Im sure I will buy the Logo Design Love book and lets hope I will be few steps closer to a nice logo design.

  5. sounds like a great book. The questions you tackle are also interesting concerning pricing, and friends/family and rights of use. can’t wait to start with the free chapter, thanks.

  6. thanks for the review, sounds like a good book and insight into the design process.

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